Remedy - Designing for healthcare

Empowering patients by providing them with faster access to health care!

ROLE - PRODUCT DESIGN LEAD

Works with the company’s Founder and President to understand customer problems, create the vision for the product and create product hypotheses to measure success, while keeping the company's goals in mind.

Creates user flows, prototypes of different fidelities, assets (logo, icons, graphics for app and online ads, etc.) and UIs based on user centered research and stakeholder interviews while validating each through multiple iterations of user tests.

PROJECT DURATION

June 2019 - Present

Solution

A mobile app that allows patients to easily find doctors and securely store and access their medical information without having to request doctors for it.

Skip ahead to the Final Design →

Screenshot of the Remedy mobile app that can be downloaded from the iOS App Store.

THE OPPORTUNITY

Only about 32% of healthcare organizations store sensitive data on the cloud today and only a fraction of this is patient health information (PHI).

We are betting that in the next 5 years, most doctors and healthcare practices in the United States will be storing PHI securely on the cloud, from where it can be securely accessed by authorized patients and other doctors.

The Problem

HEALTH CARE IN THE US IS NOT ACCESSIBLE FOR PATIENTS

Release of Information (ROI) is a document that allows the patient to decide what personal medical information they want to release from their file, who they want it released to, how long you can release that information and under what statutes and guidelines it is released

Infographic with stats showing how ROI causes patient problems. 40% of patients who don’t complete colonoscopies encounter system barriers such as paperwork or telephone challenges, leading to up to 90% preventable deaths. 24,000 people with diabetic retinopathy go blind each year, early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness by 95%.

CONSTRAINTS

Providers still store patient medical information on-prem and are uncomfortable sharing information on the cloud. This is for 2 main reasons:

One, the liability is high if something goes wrong, and so hospitals are uncomfortable with change. Two, EHRs like Epic prefer to keep patient information to themselves, as it keeps the patient within their network.

Summary

Our parent organization, Two Point Conversions has been in the health care space for the last 30 years. While they have been serving large hospital businesses like Mercy Health, Bon Secours, etc. by archiving their patient data, I was brought in as the company's first UX hire to help conceptualize a product that would be used by patients!

While we are aware that health care in the US is very unaccessible, we wanted to dive deep into the patients journey to figure out what all the pain points were and see if they had a need for such a product.

Process Overview

Remedy Process Overview - The 3 Ds

Phase 1: Discover

OVERVIEW

The goal for the Discovery phase was to perform generative research, denounce my assumptions and understand the journey a patient in the US goes through, from the time they are sick to the time they feel well.

RESEARCH METHODS

image illustrating all the different research methods I used to understand the patient's journey when they fall sick which are 5 interviews with doctors, 1 focus group with members of a large hospital, 40+ interviews with recent patients, 3 interviews with medical receptionists, 21 interviews with internal stakeholders, guerilla interviews with industry experts at HIMSS conference 2019 and secondary research

Research Methods used in the Discovery Phase

QUALITATIVE INTERVIEWS AND GUERRILLA RESEARCH

Objective - Understand in detail the journey of a patient in the US from when they fall ill, to when they get well again.

Key Result - Draw a patient journey map

I first realized that the health care journey for a patient is very different in the US when compared to India, when I had to visit the dentist.

Everything from finding a dentist who accepted my insurance, figuring which of my two health insurance cards to use, the sensitive nature of health records was extremely different.


Photographs taken at HIMSS conference 2019

Guerrilla research at the HIMSS Conference 2019


Screenshots of interview note snippets

Interview Note Snippets

Competitive Analysis

Understand in detail the work that other companies are doing both in the health care industry and in adjacent industries.

Objective - Create and capture uncontested market space.

Key Result - Conduct SWOT Analysis, List Porter's 5 Forces with respect to our company.

Download Report

Phase 2: Synthesize

OVERVIEW

The goal for the Discovery phase was to synthesize the research from the previous phase, and define an unambiguous, prioritized and measurable user pain-point, to solve for.

SYNTHESIS METHODS

image illustrating all the different research methods I used to understand the patient's journey when they fall sick which are 5 interviews with doctors, 1 focus group with members of a large hospital, 40+ interviews with recent patients, 3 interviews with medical receptionists, 21 interviews with internal stakeholders, guerilla interviews with industry experts at HIMSS conference 2019 and secondary research

PATIENT JOURNEY MAP

Consolidating all our notes from our interviews, we learned that a patient's health care journey can be broken down into 8 stages, from before they fall ill to when they fall ill and eventually recover.

Patient Journey Map from Interview Notes

PATIENT JOURNEY KEY INSIGHTS

Through an Affinity Diagram, we were also able to consolidate our notes into 8 Key Insights. Each insight represents a pain point reported by our interviewees and presents an opportunity worth solving for.

Patient Journey Map - Key Insights

Validation through MTURK Survey

We surveyed 224 people who live in the US, regarding their health care habits. Our goal was to get a general idea of how people's health care habits and to see whether our research insights held true for a larger random population. Here are some of the results

Remedy MTurk Survey Results

PERSONAS TO CREATE EMPATHY

We used the key insights from our journey map exercise to develop personas for our two main stakeholders - doctors and patients.

The objective of the personas are to help us empathize with our patients more and increase the odds of coming up with solutions that will better solve their problems.

Provider and Patient Personas

THE PROBLEM REDEFINED

How might we nudge patients to take the initiative and upload their medical information to a secure and accessible location in the cloud?

Phase 3: Ideation

OVERVIEW

The goal for the Ideation phase was to create innovative solutions for the problem we defined at the end of the Synthesis phase. As UX hire #1 at the company, one of my responsibilities is to mentor internal stakeholders on Design Thinking methods. One ideation exercise I organized with them was 5 Star Experiences.

THE 5 STAR HEALTH CARE EXPERIENCE

I came up with a fun activity where me and the rest of the team (people who were being introduced to design thinking methods for the first time) had to come up with an imaginary over the top health care experience that they would rate it more than 5 stars on Yelp or Google Reviews!

This was inspired by Airbnb's 11 star experience, approach to creating products that I heard about on Masters of Scale

Here are some snippets from their 5 star stories!

5 Star Review Examples

CONCEPT EXPLORATION

We then began rapidly ideating a number of concepts before narrowing in on a select few before creating user flows, user stories and storyboards to define user requirements. We voted on the concepts and decided to experiment with 2 concepts. This would give us enough breadth to experiment with ideas and interactions without straying away from the problem we were solving for.

#1 - APPOINTMENT SCHEDULER

A mobile app that allows patients to book appointments with nearby doctors, and fill out medical forms and share health records with these doctors prior to the appointment.

Appointment Scheduler - Initial Storyboard

#2 - DOC2DOC

A "social network" for patients and health care professionals that allows stakeholders to access and share their medical health information between each other.

Doc2Doc - Initial Storyboard

APPOINTMENT SCHEDULER - PAPER PROTOTYPE

Appointment Scheduler - Paper Prototype

Medical Records Store - PAPER PROTOTYPE

Medical Records Store - Paper Prototype

Phase 4: Design

OVERVIEW

The goal for the Design phase was to start building the first versions of our app's screens.

LITERATURE REVIEW

We looked at analogous spaces to help influence our design thinking process. Here are some of the things we looked at for inspiration.

1. Hospital Waiting Rooms - Adding the perception of space by keeping things like cups and magazines in order, large lightly colored walls, etc. act as calming elements and help reduce stress.

2. Transparency - By letting patients see waiting times through wait-time boards, and doctor statuses helps reduce anxiety

3. Biophilia Hypothesis - A glimpse of the outdoors with windows can feel like a reprieve from the stress indoors. And as with artwork depicting nature and actual plants, it gives people something familiar to look at, and familiarity provides a feeling comfort.

BRANDING PHILOSOPHY

A parent taking their child to the hospital puts on a brave face and constantly tries to convince their child that everything will be alright! We wanted Remedy to play the part of the parent for everyone using Remedy!

DESIGN PRINCIPLES

Aesthetic Integrity - Aesthetic integrity represents how well an app’s appearance and behavior integrates with its function. Remedy is used by people who are feeling unwell. Demonstrate respect and empathy for their time and attention through thoughtful and elegant craftsmanship.

Clarity - Eliminate ambiguity. Enable patients to see, understand and act with confidence.

Efficiency - Streamline and optimize workflows. Intelligently anticipate needs to help patients perform tasks better, smarter and faster.

Design as the "mutual friend" - Helping minimize uncertainties and setting expectations is critical for patients. Remedy lets users know that we care, are there for them and will do everything to help. Like a good friend, who accompanies you to the hospital, we're there for you when you need us.

APPOINTMENT SCHEDULER - MEDIUM FIDELITY PROTOTYPE

Appointment Scheduler - Medium Fidelity Prototype

PRODUCT BRANDING

This helped us answer questions related to branding, color palette, typography, illustration and iconography.

Remedy Branding

Phase 5: HI FIDELITY DESIGN

1. Search for doctors based on symptoms

Patients can log into the app and search for near by doctors based on their symptoms and insurance provider

Task: Search for a Primary Care doctor, for a general illness
(Note: Right-click the video to show controls and pause, rewind, etc.)

From our interviews we learned that people tend to not remember the name of the doctor they visited. They don't remember the medical condition (exact terminology) they were suffering from. They don't remember exactly when they visited the doctor.

They do remember the type of doctor they saw (Eg: Dentist, gynecologist, dermatologist, etc.)

This is the reason the search feature is designed as two sequential search actions. 1) Search for 'doctor type' followed by 2) Search for 'visit reason'.

UI STATES TO IMPROVE USABILITY

Using different UI states to communicate to the user

MOTION DESIGN TO DIRECT USER FOCUS

The search and the 'Medical Emergency' components leverage motion (upward slide animation) to direct user's focus, assisting the user to perform the required action.

TASK ANALYSIS

Search Screen - Patient Task Analysis

2. Onboarding - Lazy Registration

Patients who want to immediately use Remedy, search for a doctor and create an appointment without conducting a formal registration beforehand can do so. They are formally asked to register only when they want to confirm an appointment.

Patients can sign up without looking for an appointment from their profile screens.

Task: Book an appointment and with Dr. Amanda on November 1 2020
(Note: Right-click the video to show controls and pause, rewind, etc.)

TASK ANALYSIS

For testing, we split users into two groups.

Group 1 would be able to search for their doctor and be able to create an account as part of that flow. group 2 would not be able to find their doctor, and would have to create an account through their profile screen.

Onboarding Screens - Patient Task Analysis

KEY TAKEAWAYS

If a patient doesn't find a doctor, they are less likely to create an account. 70% of patients still create an account through the profile screen for two reasons. 1) They liked the experience, and spent time already on the app and creating an account can only help them. 2) They perceived the lack of doctors to be a bug on our side, and created an account hoping that it will help fix the bug.

A screen saying 'Onboarding successfully completed' might help. 2/5 patients were confused with the sudden change in screens.

3. Appointment Confirmation Flow

There is a natural delay after a patient books an appointment and before the receptionist at the practice can confirm the appointment. This delay was causing confusion amongst patients during the early stages of the design process.

Another issue that we detected, was that our old screen supported only 1 appointment at a time. Some patients book a years worth of recurring appointments and we needed to design for that use case too.

Our solution was to split the appointment flow into 2 categories. 1) Confirming Appointment screens and 2) Confirmed Appointment screens. Each would have 2 states. 1) Maximized to eliminate distractions and clearly communicate states with patients and 2) Minimized to give patients a high level view, and allow them to see multiple confirmed appointments at a time.

100% of our users were unable to use the old Appointment screens. This was brought down to ~20%.

Task: Confirm an appointment and with Dr. Amanda
(Note: Right-click the video to show controls and pause, rewind, etc.)

MOTION DESIGN TO COMMUNICATE UI STATES

We added an animation to each of the appointment cards while they were in the 'confirming' state, to further indicate to the user that these appointments were still being processed.

More than 90% of our users brought up this issue during testing.

Appointment Confirmation State Animation

TASK ANALYSIS

For testing, we split users into two groups.

Group 1 would be able to search for their doctor and be able to create an account as part of that flow. group 2 would not be able to find their doctor, and would have to create an account through their profile screen.

Appointment Screens - Patient Task Analysis

KEY TAKEAWAYS

The screens are still not optimized for users who have recurring appointments and book multiple appointments ahead of time. 100% of users can complete this task but it is tedious work.

4. Medical Form Flow

The big problem during testing was that users were complaining that the filling out the form was a tedious task. People were completing the task as part of the test, but it was unlikely that patients would fill out the entire form in Production. We solved this by splitting the form into 3 bite sized sections. General, Medical info and Review.

... As far as the forms go, I'd be worried that I'd waste all my time filling out form on my phone and then they'd make me do it again at the office anyway. Anonymous User Tester

Task: Complete Dr. Amanda's mandatory preliminary medical form through Remedy
(Note: Right-click the video to show controls and pause, rewind, etc.)

ENGENDERING TRUST

Another issue is trust. People were worried that the app was not saving their info, and they were too nervous to test it and lose all the information they had put into the app.

For this we added 1) A loading spinner to provide feedback to the user that the app was in fact working and processing their data and 2) A save button that the user could use to save their progress.

100% of users used the 'save' button during the test, even though the app saves updates to the form automatically!

Form Feedback to Engender Trust

TASK ANALYSIS

100% of user testers were able to find and complete the medical form.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

... data being hacked from patients healthcare info I would want a server that is as secure as can be Anonymous User Tester
... I do not feel comfortable with HIPPA information being on the app. How do you know it is impenetrable? Anonymous User Tester

People are worried entering their personal medical information into a mobile app. We still have a lot to do and figure out a way to actively alleviate their concerns and biases.

FINAL DESIGN MOCKUPS

Screenshot of the Remedy mobile app that can be downloaded from the iOS App Store.
Screenshot of the Remedy mobile app that can be downloaded from the iOS App Store.
Screenshot of the Remedy mobile app that can be downloaded from the iOS App Store.
Screenshot of the Remedy mobile app that can be downloaded from the iOS App Store.

MEASURING USER FEEDBACK

Measuring users' experience using an exit survey. Our goal was to get a score of 8+

Screenshot of the Remedy mobile app that can be downloaded from the iOS App Store.

Final Score: 6.95

We were aiming to achieve a score of 8. We believe that we can still increase our scores, and have experiments lined up to improve our transparency and share-ability metrics, especially transparency where there is large scope for improvement.